Sunday, 6 April 2008

CLIMATE CHANGE

I have just spent three days in hospital in a ward where it was hotter than a Swedish sauna - though, obviously, without the sex! Radiators too scalding to touch were pumping heat into a room that throbbed like the core of nuclear reactor and with the windows pushed open to the maximum-allowed aperture of two inches in a vain attempt to let some of it out into the already overburdened atmosphere.

Now, I'm back home in our refreshingly uncentrally-heated flat and - guess what? - outside its snowing a blizzard!

The world is truly losing its grip! And to make matters worse - very bad news for a Sunday morning, this - I have to tell you---

GOD is DEAD...


...or, at least, His Official Spokesman is silenced


CHARLTON HESTON


1923-2008

***

Of course, Charlton ('Chuck') Heston didn't just represent God, he was also the quintessential Hollywood representation of what it means to be an American.

As PAULINE KAEL, the legendary film critic of The New Yorker once wrote: "With his perfect, lean-hipped, powerful body, Heston is a god-like hero; built for strength, he is an archetype of what makes Americans win. He represents American power - and he has the profile of an eagle."

Read the obituary in today's L A Times



9 comments:

Boll Weavil said...

Long John Silver is dead too ! Charlton Heston's portrayal of Stevenson's anti-hero is stronger than Newton's and Orson Welles (oops blasphemy there on two counts)and far more believable.Another of the big names gone...

Eudora said...

Yes, the climate changes, but the brits, at least, have some water, some rain...

Mr. Sibley, I offer you my condolences for the loss of Mr Heston, but I miss in your blog, weeks ago, some words for Mr. Scofield, not only a great actor...

Brian Sibley said...

BOLL - You are right, Chuck was a great LJS - one of many towering performances, though, for me, his finest hour was in that brilliant era-defining movie, Planet of the Apes.

Who can forget him sinking to his knees on the edge of the in-coming surf and pounding the sand with his fists as he looks up at the ruined remains of the Statue of Liberty... "You blew it up! God damn you! God damn you all to Hell!"

EUDORA - You are right... I ought to have mentioned the passing of Paul Scofield who I admired ever since seeing him as Sir Thomas More in the film of Robert Bolt's A Man for All Seasons. Watching him on stage in Amadeus and, late in his career, as John Gabriel Borkman, were two of my most unforgettable theatrical experiences.

In case you missed it, here's a nice Scofield story from almost 12 months ago on this blog...

Eudora said...

Yes, Scofield story, I remember it because that story was the first time I visitted your blog, a beautiful story...

I have many favourites actors and actresses, (unfortunately I never see all of them on the stage)... but I think that Scofield is the first in my list, and not only for his talent on stage or in the few films he made...

Brian Sibley said...

EUDORA - There was something haunting about Scofield's vulnerability: the soft-spoken lilt and sway with which he delivered his lines, the half-hooded eyes, the sense of secretive mischief lurking at the corners of the smile...

Eudora said...

Excellent tibute Brian.

To me, the surprise of Scofield work was his way of breaking the harmony of his voice, the half-falsettos, a different way to perform, new way to perform I think... I think I am going to write something in my blog on Mr. Scofield, tonight perharps...

Brian Sibley said...

EUDORA - I would say that I look forward to reading it, but without knowing any Spanish, that's going to be a bit difficult!

But I have just visited your new blog, Eudora en su Arcadia, and looked at your first post!! So, welcome to the blogosphere, Eudora!

¡ Hasta la vista !

LisaH said...

Talking of the demise of Charlton Heston, my favourite film of his was El Cid.
Not far behind it was Soylent Green - which could well provide a fairly accurate prediction of the future of the planet, unfortunately.
The scene with Edward G Robinson where they were playing Beethoven's Pastoral and he was watching what life used to be like is one of the most striking ones I've seen.

Brian Sibley said...

LISAH - Yes, Soylent Green: a brilliant, underrated film. Must watch it again...

And El Cid: another classic Heston ending as the dying Rodrigo is strapped into the saddle of his horse and, watched by the mourning Sopia Loren, rides off into the sunset and the realm of legend. Wonderful!