Wednesday, 24 October 2012

WINE WHINE

WIne lables these days increasingly seem to suggest that the bottle contains a miscellany of ingredients – ranging from flint to cut grass – as opposed to the more conventional grapes!

For example, a Domaine de Majas 2010 is described as having 'pronounced fennel and camomile aromas' leading 'onto a fresh palate with hints of stone fruits and mineral acidity.'

However, I noticed it on a restaurant wine-list recently with an even more flowery description:
Walk through a soft meadow filled with herbs, into an orchard with a red apple tree, delicious and intriguing.
Frankly, that ought to win a fantasy literature award1

2 comments:

Eudora said...

Yes, today the romanticism and naturalism is only for the wines and the restaurant`s receipes...

And know a little more "literature":

BUY SPANISH WINES, LET THEM BRING YOU TO A NEW WORLD OF EXPERIENCES, FROM THE GREEN FIELDS OF THE NORTH TO THE SUNNY LANDS OF THE SOUTH. REDS, ROSÉ, WHITES, AMONTILLADOS, SPARKLINGS, SHERRIES.


P.S.: No, I don't have any connection with the spanish wine industry.... as a matter of fact I don't drink wine... well, except vermouth, from time to time ;)

Anonymous said...

These oenophile ramblings may not be as potty as they look at first blush. Remember that every living thing is descended from a single original cell: every organism is every other organism's cousin. So it wouldn't really be surprising if, among all the thousands of chemicals in a grape, there were one or two that you'ld also find in an apple or a blade of grass. The situation is analogous to the way a Shakespeare sonnet and a chocolate bar wrapper might both feature the word sweet, or a Bach fugue and an Elton John song share a B-flat. Chemistry is, as it were, the dictionary from which biology weaves its tales, and I've already wittered away for longer than I meant to! Best wishes ever :-)