Thursday, 22 October 2009

A SIGN FROM HEAVEN

Spotting the following sign outside a chapel on the Greek island of Kalymnos, I was reminded of the words of Ezekiel (Chap. 33, v. 11):

"As I live, saith the Lord GOD, I have no pleasure in the death of the wicked; but that the wicked turn from his way and live: turn ye, turn ye from your evil ways..."

This Way to God
Remember, however, that all Greeks drive in the middle of the road so, when coming up to any turn, keep your wits about you or you might well end up dead - wicked or not!

Image: Brian Sibley © 2009 uploaded by flickr.

13 comments:

scb said...

The motto of my brain has long been "a song for everything, and everything with a song", so the little DJ in my brain just started playing "Turn back o man forswear thy foolish ways" -- the raunchy sounding version from Godspell.

Love this post! (Blog post, sign post, whichever...) ;-)

DROTOMB -- where one ends up if one does not pay attention when driving in Greece. (as I've seen elsewhere, "either one is quick or one is dead")

Eudora said...

Oh, Brian, you see a traffic sign and then you remember the Bible, the book of Ezequiel.... is awesome.

Sheila said...

Thanks, scb, I've got that tune running through my head now!!

In Greece one has not only to worry about driving, but also about walking in traffic free zones: signs that say No Vehicles don't apply to speeding motorbikes, small three wheelers or any other motorised vehicle that can squeeze through.

SharonM said...

Yes, you have an extraordinary mind, Brian - and fortunately, you always seem to have a camera on you too!

Brian Sibley said...

SCB - Ah, Godspell, I remember sitting in the theatre watching the show when one of the characters - Salome, perhaps? - came down into the audience with a feather boa and sat on my lap! As a just-out-of-teens-ager, it was a toe-curling moment!

EUDORA - All those verses I learned by rote in Sunday School still come back to me, along with entire hymns and choruses complete with actions.

SHEILA - We have freeways, the Greeks (in fact, most Mediterranean people) have free-for-all-ways!

SHARON M - Yep! Camera-ready Sibley, they call me!

Brian Sibley said...

GILL e-mails the following comment...


"On Kalymnos at least, it is only sensible to drive in the middle of the road. On one side there are falling rocks, on the other a long drop to the sea!"


That's true, Gill, except when the middle of the road is full of goats!

Eudora said...

I see, then you have a superb religious education, as, I think, most of the europeans, except the "Very Catholic Spain". You now, it was a time that to read the Bible was prohibited...Matters of the history and culture...

scb said...

YouTube version of song, with feather boa, now posted on my blog, along with an interesting challenge from one of my blog-buddies. Enjoy!

http://serenityathome.blogspot.com/2009/10/earworm-while-i-think.html

Brian Sibley said...

EUDORA - Well, I learnt more, I think, with the heart than with the head...

SCB - Great! I guess it's not Salome after all. Must have been the feather boa that confused me!

scb said...

Salome would need seven of them, and they'd be veils, not boas... ;-) (Veils are less constricting than boas. Sorry. I couldn't resist. My name is SCB and I'm a bad-pun addict.)

I saw Godspell on stage in September 1974 -- that sure takes me back!

Suzanne said...

We have a saying in French about traffic lights, particularly when they're red: In Europe they are "impératif", in the Mediterranean they are "facultatif" and in North Africa they are "décoratif"!
kosmis: the Greek word for the faculty of doing what you like at a red light

Boll Weavil said...

Greece is the only place where I've been overtaken by a man on a moped carrying a dog under one arm. On Crete we came across a set of table and chairs on a pedestrian crossing and my own favourite, a couple towing their garden produce on a trailor with a goat in the trailor eating it !
Luski : The act of flashing your headlights constantly to warn oncoming road users of a speed trap ahead. In Greece, the oncoming road user is probably a mad motorcyclist with no helmet towing an animal but no matter, he must be warned.

Brian Sibley said...

Love the quote, SUZANNE, and yes, BOLL, dogs (and, indeed, goats) on bikes are common Greek road hazards that make our crazy cyclists and suicidal pedestrians seem nothing more than minor irritations...