Wednesday, 28 December 2011

SCENT CRAZY

You know how, nowadays, wine no longer tastes of what it is traditionally made from – grapes – but, according to the back-label, may be described in terms of various fruits, coffee, chocolate, chili, pine-needles, aromatic herbs or flint – when did you last suck on a piece of flint?

Well, it could be that this is just a drinker's version of the way in which perfumes have always been been described: interestingly, usually in terms of things you eat and therefore taste as well as smell.

I came across some 'ripe' descriptions recently that I thought you might enjoy...

Paco Rabane 1 Million


This comes in a bottle that looks like a gold ingot (but isn't!) and is is described in terms of a fruit cocktail, thus: "This fragrance is fresh and sparkling with notes of grapefruit, mint and orange, creating a striking mix of sophistication and sensuality."

Or to give you the essence of that pictorially...



Then there is...

Boss Orange Man



This 'new feel-good fragrance for liberated guys', as used by Orlando Bloom, is; "An energising blend of crispy apple, comforting vanilla, warm frankincense and exotic West African bubinga woo0d." (What wood?)

In contrast...

Carolina Herrera 212 VIP MEN


Is a fragrance that might be described (apparently) as "...a party animal! It's a cocktail of vodka, passion fruit, frozen mint, ginger, black pepper, lime, caviar, leather spices, amber and king wood." (Yes, more wood!) As the ad copy says – almost incredulously – "All that in one bottle."

And (finally for this selection) there is...

CK SHOCK for him


This fragrance is, we are told, "...built around aromatic, spicy nuances. It opens with fresh cucumber and sugar. The heart of black pepper, black basil and cardamon is placed on the base of masculine tobacco [ as opposed to the feminine variety?] musk, patchouli and [yes, of course, what else?] ambrene wood."

I'm exhausted before I've even got the top of the bottle...

Oh, well, maybe just stick with the Old Spice, then...

8 comments:

scb said...

Fascinating. I'd like to know how something that smells of apple, frankincense and bubinga wood (and something else that I've forgotten already) gets named ORANGE? I must find out what a bubinga is when it's home.

Hmmm... it's often used in the making of musical instruments. This from a description of the bubinga harp: "Bubinga produces a bright, clear, ringing tone with a lot of sustain, emphasizing the fundamental note."

Not to harp on it or anything, but I still don't see where the orange comes in.

Nice pictures, by the way. Quite delicious. And I don't mean the way the fragrances are described in terms of foodstuffs...

My word verif. is "Ambolu". That sounds like some sort of wood, to me...

Brian Sibley said...

A damn good question! And, anyway, why 'orange' rather than 'tangerine', 'clementine' or 'satsuma'??

As to the elusive 'bubinga' wood: not just harps, apparently, but other instruments, such as acoustic and electric guitars and drum shells. Not to mention its use in the production of archery bows, furniture making (usually for tables), handgun grips and the interior of Lexus cars! But, as you say, it is NOT orange!

SharonM said...

I think I prefer my perfumes without the descriptions - better to let your nose tell you what it is like.

Orlando Bloom is by far the tastiest model, by the way.

Eudora said...

Far as I know is normal that the masculine fragrances are made with wood aromas and the female contain more fruity aromas, this has always been the main difference.
On the other hand what I already don`t know is where you draw the energy or sophisticated scent... and caviar in an eau de toilette?.. aagghh

Another thing: you can imagine the amount of African and South American woods that there are today in the market.

Brian Sibley said...

SharonMReally? In preference to the other two specimens?

Eudora – I agree: 'caviar' is very fishy! ;)

SharonM said...

Brian - the other 'specimens' do nothing for me, I'm afraid.

Anonymous said...

What got me thinking is this: how can anything smell of vodka?

Brian Sibley said...

Good point!!